Steam Locomotives of the NSWGR and Private Industry.

Z12  4-4-0  First arrived in 1877. 34 from Beyer Peacock, 26 from Dubs & Co, 8 from Atlas Engineering Sydney. The last operational engine 1219 was retired in 1974.
Z12 Z12
       Final configuration.                      As supplied.

   From a Photo by  Leon Oberg               From a Photo by NSWGR

Cylinders: two        18 x 24 inches      Grate area          14.75 sq.ft
Driving wheels: four  5 ft 6 in dia       Total weight        59.5 Tons
Tractive effort       13196 lb            Valve gear          Stephenson
Boiler pressure       140 lbs/sq.in


Z19  0-6-0  First arrived in 1877. 54 from Beyer Peacock, 18 from Henry Vale and 5 from Robert Stephenson. The last operational engine 1923 was retired in 1972.
Z19 Z19
       Final configuration.      As supplied, the 19 was very like this E17.

   From a Photo by  R.G.Preston             From a Photo by NSWGR

Cylinders: two       18 x 24 inches      Grate area           17.9 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  4 ft dia            Total weight         61.5 tons
Tractive effort      19440 lb            Valve gear           Stephenson
Boiler pressure      150 lbs/sq.in


Z26  2-6-2  First arrived in 1892. All 20 built by Dubs & Co. The last operational engine 2604 retired from NSWGR in 1970, 2605 from Private Industry in 1982.
Z26
   From a Photo by Leon Oberg                From a Photo by P. Neve

Cylinders: two       18 x 26 ins          Grate area           21 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  4 ft dia             Total weight         65.9 tons
Tractive effort      21060 lb             Valve gear           Stephenson
Boiler pressure      150 lbs/sq.in


Z27  2-6-0  First arrived in 1913. All 8 built by Hunslet & Co. All were retired by 1960. Z27
   From a Photo by R.G.Preston              From a Photo by Mark Gibbons

Cylinders: two       18 x 24 ins          Grate area             21 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  4 ft dia             Total weight           93 tons
Tractive effort      18000 lb             Valve gear    Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      140 lbs/sq.in


C30  4-6-4  First arrived in 1903. 95 from Beyer Peacock and 50 from NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops. The last operational engine retired in 1971.
C30
   From a Photo by Leon Oberg                From a Photo by J. Beckhaus

Cylinders: two       18.5 x 24 ins          Grate area          24 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  4 ft 7 in dia          Traction Weight     37 tons
Tractive effort      19116 lb               Total weight        72.3 tons
Boiler pressure      160 lbs/sq.in          Valve gear    Allan Straight link
Drawbar Horsepower   800 at 20-45 MPH
Drawbar Horsepower   950 at 30 MPH



C30  4-6-4  In 1921 a total of 88 were specially modified at Eveleigh Workshops to pull heavier trains of non-powered electric cars round the network, including Sydney's steep North Shore line. Modified C30 The last operational engine retired in 1971.
Cylinders: two       19 x 24 ins 
Driving wheels: six  4 ft 7 in dia
Tractive effort      22050 lb
Boiler pressure      175 lbs/sq.in
Grate area           24 sq.ft
Traction Weight      41 tons     
Total weight         72.3 tons

From a Photo by   the late L A Clark

C30t  4-6-0  In 1928 77 C30 Tank engines were converted to tender engines, 67 at NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops and 10 at Clyde Engineering Co. The last operational engine retired in 1971. C30t
Cylinders: two       19 x 24 ins 
Driving wheels: six  4 ft 7 in dia
Tractive effort      21424 lb
Boiler pressure      160 lbs/sq.in
Grate area           24 sq.ft
Total weight         99.75 tons
Valve gear        Allan straight link
Drawbar Horsepower   800 at 20-45 MPH
Drawbar Horsepower   950 at 30 MPH

From a Photo by   N.S.W.R.T.M.

C32  4-6-0  First arrived in 1892. 106 from Beyer Peacock, 45 from Clyde Eng. Sydney, 20 from Baldwin Loco Works and 20 from NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops.The last operational engine 3229 retired at the end of 1971.
C32 class
Final configuration with superheaters.  As supplied with saturated boiler.

Cylinders: two       21 x 26 ins        Grate area            27 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  5 ft dia           Total weight          110 tons
Tractive effort      25990 lb           Valve gear      Allan straight link
Boiler pressure      160 lbs/sq.in      Drawbar Horsepower  800 at 15-50 MPH
                                                           1000 at 30 MPH
From Photos by   NSWGR

C35  4-6-0  First arrived in 1914. All 35 from NSWGR Eveleigh Railway Workshops Sydney. Last operational engine 3501 retired in 1968.
C35
   From a Photo by J.Beckhaus           From a Photo by the late Fred Yates

Cylinders: two       22.5 x 26 ins     Grate area              30.5 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  5 ft 9 in dia     Total weight            128 tons
Tractive effort      29186 lb          Valve gear              Stephenson
Boiler pressure      180 lbs/sq.in     Drawbar Horsepower  1000 at 15-50 MPH
                                                           1200 at 30 MPH


C36  4-6-0  First arrived in 1925. 65 from Clyde Eng Sydney and 10 from NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops Sydney. The last operational engine 3642 retired in 1969.
C36
Fitted with belpaire boiler in 1953    Delivered with round top boiler 1925

    From a photo by Leon Oberg         From a photo by the late Fred Yates

Cylinders: two       23 x 26 ins      
Driving wheels: six  5 ft 9 in dia         
Tractive effort      33887 lb             Tractive effort    30500 lb
Boiler pressure      200 lbs/sq.in        Boiler pressure    180 lbs/sq.in
Grate area           30.5 sq.ft
Total weight         160 tons
Valve gear           Pin & Slot Walschaert
Drawbar Horsepower   1300 HP at 25 - 70 MPH
Drawbar Horsepower   1400 HP at 45 MPH


C38  4-6-2  Streamlined. First arrived in 1943. All 5 from Clyde Eng Sydney. Was to have a power stoker but used special coal instead as freighter carrying power stoker from USA sank during WW2 or so the story goes. The last operational engine 3801 retired 1970 then overhauled for tour service.
C38 Streamlined
Cylinders: two       21.5 x 26 ins     Grate area             47 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  5 ft 9 in dia     Total weight           201 tons
Tractive effort      36273 lb          Valve gear      Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      245 lbs/sq.in     Drawbar Horsepower  2000 at 30-80 MPH
                                                           2200 at    50 MPH
From Photos by  NSWGR

C38  4-6-2  Non-streamlined. First arrived in 1943. 13 from NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops Sydney and 12 from NSWGR Cardiff Workshops Newcastle. Same power stoker problem as above. The last operational engine 3820 retired in late 1970.
C38 Non-Streamlined
Cylinders: two       21.5 x 26 ins     Grate area             47 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  5 ft 9 in dia     Total weight           195 tons
Tractive effort      36273 lb          Valve gear       Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      245 lbs/sq.in     Drawbar Horsepower  2000 at 30-80 MPH 
                                                           2200 at    50 MPH 
From Photos by  NSWGR


D50  2-8-0  First arrived 1896. Called the "Standard Goods". 151 from Beyer Peacock, 84 from North British, 30 from Clyde Eng, 10 from Neilson Reid & Co and 5 from Dubs & Co. The last operational engine 5069 retired in 1973. Note the low running board.
D50 Standard Goods
Final configuration with superheaters.  As supplied with saturated boiler.

   From a Photo by  R.G.Preston             From a Photo by NSWGR

Cylinders: two      22 x 26 ins       Grate area              29 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8   4 ft 3 in dia     Total weight            131.75 tons
Tractive effort     33557 lb          Valve gear       Allan straight link
Boiler pressure     160 lbs/sq.in     Drawbar Horsepower  800 at 10-35 MPH
                                                          1000 at 20 MPH


D53  2-8-0  First arrived 1912. 160 from Clyde Eng Sydney and 30 from NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops Sydney. D53 Standard Goods The last operational engine 5365 retired in 1973. Note the high running board.
Cylinders: two       22 x 26 ins 
Driving wheels: 8    4 ft 3 in dia
Tractive effort      33557 lb
Boiler pressure      160 lbs/sq.in
Grate area           28.75 sq.ft
Total weight         124.5 tons
Valve gear     Allan straight link
Drawbar Horsepower   800 at 10-35 MPH
Drawbar Horsepower   1000 at 20 MPH


From a Photo by   R.G.Preston

D57  4-8-2  First arrived 1929. All 25 built by Clyde Eng Sydney. First to have power stoker. Only NSWGR engine to have three cylinders (D58s are only another batch of badly modified D57s). The last operational engine 5711 retired in 1962. D57
From a Photo by  NSWGR
Cylinders: three     23.25 x 28 ins    Grate area           65 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8    5 ft dia          Total weight         227.75 tons
Tractive effort      56000 lb          Valve gear      Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      200 lbs/sq.in     3rd cyl    Gresley conjugating gear
Drawbar Horsepower   2400 HP at 25 - 50 MPH


D58  4-8-2  First arrived 1950. The building of 13 shared between the NSWGR Eveleigh Workshops Sydney and Cardiff Workshops Newcastle. They were basically only another batch of badly modified D57s. The last operational engine retired in 1957 after an operational life of only 7yrs and was scrapped in 1964. D58
From a Photo by  NSWGR
Cylinders: three     21.5 x 28 ins     Grate area           65 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8    5 ft dia          Total weight         227.75 tons
Tractive effort      55000 lb          Valve gear      Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      200 lbs/sq.in     3rd cyl         Rack & Pinion gear
Drawbar Horsepower   2400 HP at 25 - 50 MPH


D59  2-8-2  First arrived 1952. All 20 built by Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Corp. Supplied as oil-burners but subsequently converted to coal-burners. The last operational engine 5910 retired at end of 1972.
D59
   From a photo by Leon Oberg              From a photo by P C Booth

Cylinders: two       21 x 28 ins      Grate area              47 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8    5 ft dia         Total weight            150.25 tons
Tractive effort      34986 lb         Valve gear      Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      200 lbs/sq.in    Drawbar Horsepower  1200 at 18-45 MPH
                                                          1400 at 30 MPH


AD60  4-8-4+4-8-4  First arrived in 1952. All 42 from Beyer Peacock & Co. The only Garratt on the NSWGR and the heaviest in the world. It is 108.6 feet long. The last operational engine 6042 retired in 1973. AD60 Garratt
From a Photo by  Beyer Peacock
Cylinders: four     19.875 x 26 inches 
Driving wheels: 16  4 ft 7 in dia
Tractive effort     63490 lb
Boiler pressure     200 lbs/sq.in
Grate area          63.5 sq.ft  with power stoker
Total weight        265 tons 
Valve gear          Drop-Arm Walschaert



Kitson Tank.  2-8-2  First arrived 1908. All 3 from Kitson & Co. Used by John Brown Coal on his colliery lines Kitson Tank near Newcastle NSW. Numbered 9,10 and 11. The last operational engine No 9 "Pelaw Main" retired in late 1979.
Cylinders: two       20 x 26 ins 
Driving wheels: 8    4 ft 7 in dia
Tractive effort      27229 lb
Boiler pressure      180 lbs/sq.in
Grate area           23.6 sq.ft
Total weight         90 tons
Valve gear           Stephenson

From a Photo by   R.G.Preston

ROD  2-8-0  First arrived around 1924. All 13 from British Govt WW1 Railway Operating Division. Designed by J Robinson. Built by North British Loco Co, Kitson & Co and Great Central Works Gorton. Used by John Brown on his colliery lines near Newcastle NSW. Numbered 12 to 24. The last operational engine No 23 retired in 1973.
ROD
   From a photo by Bob Driver              From a photo by Glen Buckman

Cylinders: two       21 x 26 ins        Grate area           26.25 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8    4 ft 8 in dia      Total weight         123 tons
Tractive effort      30303 lb           Valve gear           Stephenson ?
Boiler pressure      185 lbs/sq.in



SMR 10 Class  2-8-2  First arrived 1912. All 14 from Beyer Peacock & Co. Numbered 10 to 31. Used by South Maitland Railways on various colliery lines in the Maitland/Cessnock Area near Newcastle. No 10 had covered a million miles by 1957. 3 were sent to Stockrington Colliery near Newcastle in 1974. The 11 left were retired in 1983 under strange circumstances. They were put in the Steam Shed and the doors were welded shut. The 3 at Stockrington were retired in 1987 also with much animosity. They were the last steam-engines in NSW still working and doing what they were designed for, moving coal.
SMR Tank
   From a photo by G. Yates               From a photo by Bob Driver

Cylinders: two       20 x 26 ins       Grate area           29 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8    4 ft 3 in dia     Total weight         83.5 tons
Tractive effort      30000 lb          Valve gear     Allan straight link
Boiler pressure      180 lbs/sq.in


Barclay  0-6-0  First arrived 1911. Built by Andrew Barclay & Son Kilmarnock. Used by Portland Cement Co hauling cement and gypsum at Portland near Lithgow NSW. It was retired in 1982 ?
Barclay Tank
     From a photo by G.H.Eardley              From photos by G Yates

Cylinders: two       16 x 24 ins         Grate area           22 sq.ft
Driving wheels: six  3 ft 6 in dia       Total weight         41 tons
Tractive effort      19000 lb            Valve gear           Stephenson
Boiler pressure      160 lbs/sq.in



"Bradfield" suburban electric carriage before and after electrical equipment fitted. Designed by Dr Bradfield who also designed Sydney's Harbour Bridge and Underground Railway system. First of 100 arrived in 1920. Electrified by 1926. Quickly earning the nickname "bone-shakers" (hard seat padding) they were built in wood on steel frames by Clyde Eng, Ritchie Bros and Meadowbank Manufacturing, all of Sydney. They were 14 ins wider than the previously used carriages in order to seat 5 people across plus an aisle. This meant metropolitan rail lines had to be seperated further. Platforms, tunnels and bridge abutments had to be cut back 2 brick courses. All were retired by 1974.
Bradfield Pre-Electric
From Photos by  NSWGR
Voltage  1500v  DC             Motors   2 x 360 hp
Length   61 ft 6 ins           Weight   31.4 tons  electric  47 tons
Width    10 ft 6 ins           Seats    90         electric  82


"Walsh Island Dockyard" suburban electric carriage. Usually identified by the wide entry doorways. Known affectionately as the "Red Rattlers". 50 originally supplied by Leeds Forge Co England in 1925. Built in steel by Walsh Island Dockyard, Newcastle and Clyde Eng, Sydney with improved motor control. First arrived in 1926. These suburban carriages were 14 ins wider than the previously used carriages in order to seat 5 people across plus an aisle. This meant metropolitan rail lines had to be seperated further. Platforms, tunnels Walsh Island Dockyard Electric and bridge abutments had to be cut back 2 brick courses. Total number in service 352 motor and 248 trailer. All were retired by 1992.
Voltage  1500v  DC
Motors   2 x 360 hp  
Length   61 ft 6 ins
Width    10 ft 6 ins
Weight   35 tons  electric  50 tons
Seats    83       electric  71m  79t
From a Photo by  J Beckhaus



"Tulloch" suburban electric carriage. Usually identified by the twin doors. Known affectionately as the "Red Rattlers". Built in steel by Tulloch Ltd. with improved motor control. First arrived in 1940. These suburban carriages continued the tradition of electrics being 14 ins wider, than the previously used steamloco hauled carriages, in order to seat 5 people Tulloch Electric across plus an aisle. Total number in service 74 motor and 129 trailer. All were retired by 1993. (Notice the spoked wheels)
Voltage   1500v  DC
Motors    2 x 360 hp  
Length    62 ft 8 ins
Width     10 ft 6 ins
Weight    49.5 tons
Seats     64m  72t
From a Photo by  J Beckhaus



"Sputnik" suburban electric carriage. Looked similar to the Tulloch cars. Also known affectionately as the "Red Rattlers". Built in steel by Commononwealth Eng. with power operated doors controlled by the guard. First arrived in 1957. These suburban carriages were also 10 ft 6 ins wide allowing Sputnik Electric them to seat 5 people across plus an aisle. These were the last red rattlers to be made and if you compare the number of seats to the early types there are 30% less seats. The NSWGR apparently decided that passengers like cattle need not sit. Total number in service 40 motor and 40 trailer. All were retired by 1994.
Voltage   1500v  DC
Motors    4 x 200 hp  
Length    62 ft 8 ins
Width     10 ft 6 ins
Weight    51.75 tons
Seats     59m  72t
From a Photo by  NSWGR



X79  Bo-Bo  (The black box)  First arrived in 1944. A small diesel engined shunter built by General Electric USA. The last operational engine retired from the NSWGR in 1974.
X79 class Diesel Shunter
    From a Photo by  J Beckhaus               From a Photo by NSWGR

Cylinders            2 x 8                Tractive effort
Capacity             3325 cu ins             Starting           26300 lb  
Horsepower           2 x 175 hp              Continuous         13500 lb
Driving wheels: 8    34 ins in dia        Total weight         39.2 tons


Screw Coupler    Used on most Steam-hauled passenger carriages built after 1890. Left and right handed threads on the screw allow the coupling to change length easily by simply rotating the screw using the ball ended rod fitted to it. Notice the specially designed hook with the lip that prevents the link jumping out Screw Coupling when under tension. Eventually superceded by the auto-coupler which is lighter (no buffers needed) and quicker to operate but unfortuneatly develops backlash as it wears. The screw coupler does not. (When done up tight it compresses each buffer approx 40%.)
                   Max Load
Light Passenger    390 Tons  (shown)
Heavy Passenger    550 Tons
Heavy Goods       1020 Tons 
H.G. Brakevan     1020 Tons 
Adjustment range  approx 4 inches   

From a Photo by   NSWGR

FS   First arrived 1935. All 86 built in steel by Clyde Eng Sydney. Used for 2nd class sitting passengers on country trains. They are a side corridor type where the corridor crosses over in the middle giving a balanced load. There is a toilet FS 2nd class Passenger Carriage at each end. A hand brake wheel and air brake release tap are mounted in the centre cross corridor.
No of passengers     64  
No of compartments   8  
Total Length         65 ft
Bogies               4 wheel 
Bogie wheel base     8 ft
Total weight         36.5 tons

From a Photo by   NSWGR

BS   First arrived 1935. All 35 built in steel by Clyde Eng Sydney. Used for 1st class sitting passengers on country trains. They are a side corridor type where the corridor crosses over in the middle giving a balanced load. There is a toilet BS 1st class Passenger Carriage at each end. A hand brake wheel and air brake release tap are mounted in the centre cross corridor.
No of passengers     42  
No of compartments   7  
Total Length         65 ft
Bogies               4 wheel 
Bogie wheel base     8 ft
Total weight         37 tons

From a Photo by   NSWGR

TAM   First arrived 1913. They became the standard sleeping car for the NSWGR. All 50 built with wooden bodies on steel underframes by NSWGR Carriage Works Sydney. They are a side corridor type where the corridor crosses over in the middle Typical Sleeping Carriage giving a balanced load. There is a toilet at each end.
No of passengers     20  
No of compartments   10 
Total Length         72.5 ft
Bogies               6 wheel 
Bogie wheel base     12 ft
Total weight         47 tons

From a Photo by   NSWGR

VHO   First arrived 1928. A total of 20 built with wooden bodies on steel underframes by Clyde Eng, Kilburn, Ritchie Bros. Typical Large Parcel Van It has concertina vestibule connections to match passenger cars. The guard's compartment is centrally located in the van with its own door and lookout.
Total load           20 tons   
Total Length         64.5 ft
Bogies               4 wheel 
Bogie wheel base     8 ft
Total weight         35 tons

From a Photo by   NSWGR

MHO   First arrived 1925. A total of 42 built with wooden bodies on steel underframes by NSWGR Carriage Works, Typical Large Guard's Van Clyde Eng, Ritchie Bros. The guard's compartment is centrally located in the van with its own door and lookout. This van was usually the last on the train as it had no concertina vestibule connections.
Total load           20 tons  
Total Length         64.5 ft
Bogies               4 wheel 
Bogie wheel base     8 ft
Total weight         32 tons

From a Photo by   the late L A Clark


"Water carafe barrow" Used to transport water containers to the train just before departure. Total number 26. First arrived in 1908. Most retired in 1982. The bottles on the barrow are not the ones used in the 40s/50s. The bottle, shown in the right-hand pix, is similar to, but even older than, the one's with the metal-capped cork, which I remember.
Water carafe barrow at Central Station
            From a Photo taken in 1988 by J Beckhaus                         From a photo taken in 2003 by G Yates
The barrow shown is not the one I can remember. I'm sure there was one that looked like an inverted triangle with no storage underneath. The ARHS could not find any photo of a water barrow/cart. If anyone has a photo of the triangular one please contact me.
Length               9 ft 5 ins

Weight fully loaded  350 lbs

Capacity             24 carafes 
                     48 glasses


"O" Class tram. Total number 626. Fitted with contoured wooden slat seats. First arrived in 1908. Retired in 1958. O class tram
Length   45 ft 5 inches
Weight   17.75 tons
Seats    80

From a Photo taken at Manly Sept 1939

"Double-decker Bus" Built by Leyland, A.E.C. and Albion. Total number 844. First arrived in 1935. Retired in 1978. Double-decker Bus
Length   23/27 ft 
Height   13 ft
Weight   8  tons
Seats    59/61

From a Photo taken 1970 by J Beckhaus

"A big sleek locomotive" A huge sleek locomotive
Length
 76 ft 5 in

Height
 14 ft

Weight
 195 tons

Driving
wheel dia
 5 ft 9 in

From a Photo by Shane McCarthy

C32 class on a short goods train near the outlying Sydney suburb of Richmond. This was the inspiration for my animated logo. The Inspiration for my Animated Logo.

From a Photo by George Stevens.

Eveleigh Locomotive Running Sheds just after they were built in 1885. The total locomotive workshop site covered 62 acres. A brand new Eveleigh Loco Sheds.

From a Photo by NSWGR.

Eveleigh Locomotive Running Sheds in 1910. Notice the roofs are different to the previous photo. Eveleigh Loco Sheds 1910.

From a Photo by NSWGR.

Eveleigh Locomotive Running Sheds in 1961. Only two remain as the third made way for the electric lines back in the 1920s. One down and two to go.

From a Photo by NSWGR.

The last remnant of what was once the magnificent Eveleigh Running Sheds in 1964 just before they were finally demolished. Eveleigh Loco Sheds almost gone.

From a Photo by NSWRTM.

When it's a photostop, all good firing practices go out the window and it's 'pile on the coal' to make as much smoke as possible. Here is 3820, pouring it on, as it climbs towards the tunnel at Picton, New South Wales. A smokey exhaust on purpose.

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates.

When 38s are fired well, the exhaust starts out so clear that you can see through it, but if the weather is cool enough, it condenses into white water vapour. 3801 is shown south of Picton, New South Wales with its clear exhaust condensing about a foot or so above the loco. Clear exhaust condensing into white water vapour.

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates.

When 38s are fired properly, the exhaust is so clear you can see through it, if the weather is warm enough to stop it condensing. Here 3801's fire is burning well and you can actually see the power wires through the exhaust. The exhaust is so clear, you can see through it.

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates.

The present bridge over the Hawkesbury River NSW, opened in 1946. Note the pylons of the old bridge. Both sets of pylons are like icebergs, most of their bulk is under water. The tallest is over 200 feet from the bottom, set in bedrock, to the top. The 8 span bridge over the Hawkesbury River NSW

From a Photo by   NSWGR

Here we have gone back to the short period of time when both Hawksbury River rail bridges were still standing. The original bridge, built in 1889, is on the right and is 2900ft long. The new bridge, built in 1946, is on the left and is 2764ft long. Its deepest pier stretches from 184ft below the water to about 40ft above. New and old Hawksbury River rail bridges.

From a Photo by   Unknown

A beautiful still morning at Mullet Creek   Hawkesbury River NSW A beautiful still morning at Mullet Crk  Hawkesbury River NSW

From a Photo by   NSWGR

A brand new Central Railway Station in 1906 A brand new Central Railway Station in 1906

From a Photo by   NSWGR

Central Railway Station in early 1900s Central Railway Station in early 1900s

From a Photo by   NSWGR

Train Departure Board at Central Railway Station in early 1900s Train Departure Board in early 1900s

From a Photo by   NSWGR

Currabubula on the "big board" Currabubula on the 'big board' at Central Railway Station

From a Photo by   G Yates

Central Railway Station in 1950s Central Railway Station in 1950s

From a Photo by   NSWGR

Central Railway Station Rail Maze in the 1940s Central Railway Station Rail Maze in 1950s

From a Photo by   NSWGR

Central Railway Station Rail Layout from 1929 till 1980s. Platforms 1 to 15 were the country steam platforms until 1969. Central Railway Station Rail Layout in 1960s

From a Drawing by   D R Keenan

Central Railway Station in the 1940s/50s. Typically, 255 steam trains and 1300 electrics arrived and departed here, every day.
Central Railway Station in the 1940s/50s. Click to enlarge (667k).
From a Photo by   NSWGR

Electric train crossovers, also known as The Central Flyovers, at Central Railway Station.
Electric train crossovers at Central. Click to enlarge (126k).
From a Photo by   NSWGR

A train leaving a platform is like a ferry leaving the wharf. Here we see a Manly-ferry approaching the Circular Quay wharf. It's leaning towards the wharf because all the passengers have moved over to the wharf side in preparation to disembark. The inner harbour ferry is leaning towards the larger one, as its passengers have moved over to see the spectacle of the Manly-ferry churning up the water. It does this by going into full-steam-reverse for maximum stopping power. Incidently, a tall funnel means coal-fired and a short funnel indicates oil-fired or diesel.
Circular-Quay Manly-Ferry wharf in 1930s

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates

A train leaving a platform is like a ferry leaving the wharf. In this case it is exactly the same. Here we see a C32 class, unstoppable, even by a flood, at Maitland NSW.
Train at Maitland during flood

From a Photo by   the NSWGR

The Burwood to Central raceway. The Burwood to Central speedway

From a Drawing by   D R Keenan

Central Railway Station in 1980s (It's a lot bigger than this looks. See next pix.) Central Railway Station in 1980s

From a Photo by   G Yates

Train Departure Board at Central Railway Station in 1980s Train Departure Board in 1980s

From a Photo by   G Yates

The Murrurundi to Ardglen Grade The Murrundi to Ardglen Grade

Hand-drawn from a Drawing by   NSWGR circa 1923

The safety valves roar "We're ready to roll". The safety valves roar the're ready to roll

From a Photo by   NSWRTM

The valve-rod actuating lever is suspended from the right-angled crank by a short hanging lever. The valve-rod lever hangs from a short lever

From a Photo by   G Cashmore

The valve-rod actuating lever is suspended from the right-angled crank by a pin and slot. The valve-rod lever has a slot in the end

From a Photo by   C J Grose

And they said it couldn't fly. 5902 being unloaded at Sydney Harbour in 1952. Flying D59

From a Photo by NSWGR.

3246, probably the most chased of the non-preserved steam-locomotives in NSW, on the Singleton/Newcastle school train. 3246

From a Photo by Malcolm Holdsworth.

Here's a picture of a Steam Locomotive Wheel Lathe. It doesn't really have anything to do with my story, I just thought you might like to see one. Those faceplates must be around 9ft in dia. Steam Locomotive Wheel-lathe

From a Photo by William Adams & Co.

Here's another Steam Loco Wheel Lathe. This one is turning 5ft 9in C36 driving wheel tyres at Chullora loco workshops. Steam Locomotive Wheel-lathe

From a Photo by NSWGR.

Before the Electric Tram was the Steam Tram. Before that was the Horse-Drawn Tram. Here's one at Adelaide, taken in 1948. That young whipper-snapper sitting at the back on the upstairs seat is "yours truly". Horse-Drawn Tram

From a Photo by the late  Fred Yates

For Victorian steam lovers. This photo is from the late 1930s. Two of the famous S class in their Spirit of Progress disguises. Twin Spirits of Progress

From a Photo by the late  Fred Yates

Prior to 1953 the C36 looked like this. Photographed in the late 1930s this C36 is in original condition with a round top boiler which ran at 180 lbs/sqin. This is the way it looked in the trips of my childhood, until 1953, when they were fitted with Belpaire boilers running at 200 lbs/sqin which increased their tractive effort from 30500 lbs to 33887 lbs. Notice the small spoked pony-truck wheels. They were fitted to 3660 and up. The round top C36

From a Photo by the late  Fred Yates

The City of Sydney end aproach of a very young Sydney Harbour Bridge in the late 1930s. Trams on the left and trains on the right. Notice the heavy vehicular traffic. The planners were very forward thinking in those days. Pity they aren't still doing our planning now. The southern approach of the Sydney Harbour Bridge

From a Photo by the late  Fred Yates

The North Sydney end aproach of a young Sydney Harbour Bridge showing the Milson's Point tram and train stations. Milson's Point Tram & Train Stations.

From a Photo by Unknown

Testing the Sydney Harbour Bridge with 7000 tons of Steam Locomotives. Sydney Harbour Bridge with 7000 tons of Steam Locomotives.

From a Photo by NSWGR


Locofonic


  The following table gives you an idea of how high and how far the towns mentioned are from Sydney and some word equivalents :-

    Locality          Miles from Sydney    Elevation      Equivalencies
    Central                   0              70ft      |  Steam-engine
    Redfern                   0.8m                     |  Steam-locomotive
    Eveleigh Loco Depo        1.2m                     |  
    MacDonaldtown             1.5m                     |  Chimney
    Burwood                   6m             85ft      |  Smoke stack  
    Strathfield               7m                       |
    John Whitton Bridge                                |  Regulator
      over Parramatta River  11m             50ft      |  Throttle
    Eastwood                 13m            240ft      |  
    Beecroft                 17m            440ft      |  Railway line
    Normanhurst              20m            520ft      |  Railroad track
    Hornsby                  21m            594ft      | 
    Mt Kuringai              25m            700ft      |  Point  
    bridge over                                        |  Switch
      Hawksbury River        37m             50ft      |  Turnout
    Woy Woy Tunnel           42m            100ft      |   
    Gosford                  50m             25ft      |  Carriage
    Newcastle               102m             25ft      |  Car
    Singleton               148m            125ft      |  
    Scone                   195m            682ft      |  Goods train
    Murrurundi              219m           1548ft      |  Freight train
    Ardglen Tunnel          225m           2100ft      |  
    Quipolly                250m           1190ft      |  Guards van 
    Werris Creek            255m           1246ft      |  Caboose
    Currabubula             264m           1420ft      |
                                                       |  1 in 40 grade
                                                       |  2.5% grade
    The rail gauge in NSW is standard gauge 4ft 8.5ins.| 
                                                       |  Tram     
    Our stations are not at ground level but have      |  Trolley 
    platforms at carriage floor level. We dont have    |  Streetcar 
    to climb up into the carriages.                    |
                                                       |  Taxi
    An echidna is somewhat like a porcupine.           |  Cab


The information and/or Photos on this website came from the following people and/or books. I would like to express my gratitude to them for their freely given help and for making the effort to go out and photograph our beloved Steam-engines and Ferries then making them available to the rest of us via the many books they have contributed to and/or published.

Graeme Andrews, William A Bayley, John Beckhaus, Peter Booth, the late L A Clark, Bob Driver, Neil Finey, Mark Gibbons, Malcolm Holdsworth, Merv Johnson, David Keenan, Graeme Kirkby, W A J Maston, Shane McCarthy, Gary McDonald, Peter Neve, Leon Oberg, Ron Preston, George Stevens, the late Fred Yates and all the people of the NSWGR, who had the fore-sight to take all those beautiful Photos of so long ago, so that we and future generations can see the past for ourselves.

Bibliography
AETA   First Stop Central 1963 by David R Keenan & Howard R Clark isbn: none
NSWRTM   Flyer 1970 isbn: none
Locomotives of Australia 1975 by Leon Oberg isbn: 0589071734
Locomotives of Australia 1984 by Leon Oberg isbn: 0730100057   A 1999 edition is also available.
ARHS   Melbourne Steam Festival 1973 by Gary McDonald isbn: 0858490080
NSWRTM   Memories of Steam 1974 isbn: none
ARHS   NSWGR in Steam 1978 by R G Preston isbn: 0909938016
NSWRTM   Standards in Steam The 32 Class 1987 by R G Preston isbn: 0909862222
Passenger Cars of the NSWGR 1972 by the Late L A Clark isbn: 0858290057
ARHS   The Railways of J & A Brown 1972 by Gifford H Eardly isbn: 0909650004
The Railways of New South Wales 1855 to 1955 by The Department of Railways, N.S.W. isbn: none
Early Trams of Sydney New South Wales by Robin Bromby isbn: 0949675059
The Ferries of Sydney 1975 by Graeme Andrews isbn: 0589071726
ARHS   The Railways of the South Maitland Coalfields 1969 by Gifford H Eardly anln: AUS 69-2539
The Richmond Vale Railway 1990 by R G Preston isbn: 0909862265
Railway History in Illawarra 1972 by C C Singleton of the Illawarra Historical Society isbn: none
NSWRTM   Steam on the Illawarra 1979 isbn: 0909862109
NSWRTM   Steam Pictorial 1966/70 isbn: none
NSWRTM   Steam Album No.3 1973 isbn: none
NSWRTM   Swansong of Steam 1976 isbn: 0909862095
NSWRTM   Tender into Tank 1984 by R G Preston isbn: 0909862184
ARHS   To Cessnock and Beyond 1976 by Bob Driver isbn: 0909650063

AETA =   Australian Electric Traction Association   Box 1017 G.P.O. Sydney

ARHS =   Australian Railway Historical Society   67 Renwick Road   Redfern   Sydney   NSW  2016  Australia.
From overseas ph 011 61 2 9699 1714,   in Australia ph 02 9699 1714,   in Sydney ph 9699 1714.

NSWRTM =   New South Wales Rail Transport Museum   15a Belmore Street   Burwood   Sydney   NSW  2134  Australia.
From overseas ph 011 61 2 9744 9999,   in Australia ph 02 9744 9999,   in Sydney ph 9744 9999.

TBTM =   The Bus & Truck Museum   1b Gannon Street   Tempe   Sydney   NSW  2044  Australia.
From overseas ph 011 61 2 9558 1234,   in Australia ph 02 9558 1234,   in Sydney ph 9558 1234.

TSTM =   The Sydney Tramway Museum   Pitt Street   Loftus   Sydney   NSW  2232  Australia.
From overseas ph 011 61 2 9542 3646,   in Australia ph 02 9542 3646,   in Sydney ph 9542 3646.


  I have provided a list of the books used in compiling this page. You may wish to buy some of them unfortunately I dont know just how many are still in print.

 I have not managed to contact all the photographers so if your photo is here without the correct name on it please contact me so I can put your name on it.

  All of the above Photos have been altered (de-cluttered) in some way to make them display more clearly and to make them more relevant to the text. I apologise in advance but it is tricky to get photos transferred clearly to the computer screen while keeping the files as short as possible. All Photos and Drawings retain the copyright of their owners.

  If you believe that some of the specifications are incorrect please email me at and tell me your source so I can confirm the error and correct it. Any entries with a line through means I am guessing. An entry with a question mark means a few other people guessed the same answer. A plain entry means I've seen it written somewhere. Some specs are very hard to come-by so I welcome any offerings. If you have any comments at all, good or bad, email me.

  The C32 class silhouette and animation were drawn by myself (using a strong magnifying glass) based on a photo by George Stevens in NSWRTM Memories of Steam consisting of a C32 steam-loco, a KF flat wagon and a LHG guards van with a passenger compartment .

  The Murrurundi to Ardglen curve & gradient diagram was drawn by myself based on two 1923 diagrams by the NSWGR.

  I hope you find this page useful. The Steam Engines shown are only the ones I have had any thing to do with. This by no means a complete list of NSWGR or Private Industry Locomotives.

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  ©  Gary Yates   Locofonic Recordings Australia  
This page first written 9-9-1999 last updated 14-11-2003.