C32 class loco, flat truck and guard's van


Luvloco Pix.


Please use the X in the top right corner of your browser to return to the text.

 

 
D59  2-8-2  First arrived 1952. All 20 built by Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Corp. Supplied as oil-burners but subsequently converted to coal-burners. The last operational engine 5910 retired at end of 1972.
D59

   From a photo by Leon Oberg              From a photo by P C Booth

Cylinders: two       21 x 28 ins         Grate area           47 sq.ft
Driving wheels: 8    5 ft dia            Total weight         150.25 tons
Tractive effort      34986 lb            Valve gear   Drop-Arm Walschaert
Boiler pressure      200 lbs/sq.in




AD60  4-8-4+4-8-4  First arrived in 1952. All 42 from Beyer Peacock & Co. The only Garratt on the NSWGR and the heaviest in the world. It is 108.6 feet long. The last operational engine 6042 retired in 1973.
AD60 Garratt
From a Photo by  Beyer Peacock
Cylinders: four     19.875 x 26 inches 
Driving wheels: 16  4 ft 7 in dia
Tractive effort     63016 lb
Boiler pressure     200 lbs/sq.in
Grate area          63.5 sq.ft  with power stoker
Total weight        265 tons 
Valve gear          Drop-Arm Walschaert



When it's a photostop, all good firing practices go out the window and it's 'pile on the coal' to make as much smoke as possible. Here is 3820, pouring it on, as it climbs towards the tunnel at Picton, New South Wales.
A smokey exhaust on purpose.

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates.

When 38s are fired well, the exhaust starts out so clear that you can see through it, but if the weather is cool enough, it condenses into white water vapour. 3801 is shown south of Picton, New South Wales with its clear exhaust condensing about a foot or so above the loco.
Clear exhaust condensing into white water vapour.

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates.

When 38s are fired properly, the exhaust is so clear you can see through it, if the weather is warm enough to stop it condensing. Here 3801's fire is burning well and you can actually see the power wires through the exhaust.
The exhaust is so clear, you can see through it.

From a Photo by   the late Fred Yates.


Please use the X in the top right corner of your browser to return to the text.

  ©  Gary Yates   Locofonic Recordings Australia  
This page first written 10-4-2002 last updated 15-4-2002.
For emergency use only.